Talent Development

TALENT

Based on InnoPower Founder Emil Ekiyor background as a former National Football League player, we want to send a strong message to all of the nation’s tech-based, high-growth, sustainable industries. The NFL (and NBA) have a successful business model that relies on a trickle of top-level talent being prepared, equipped, and trained to play the game in the nation’s most impoverished, most economically starved communities. That is where an $80BILLION sports industry seeks out talent because they recognize the value inherent in Black children regardless of family and financial status.

This business model and system of cultivating the elite-level talent among the nation’s most underprivileged and destitute Black youth has resulted in elevating American pro sports leagues that are unmatched anywhere in the world. This same philosophy can be adopted to prepare and equip Black students in Indiana to compete in non-sports industries and cultivate Competitiveness in any industry.

2022 Brookings Institute –  The world is experiencing a tech talent crisis. In the U.S. alone, there were 920,000 unfilled information technology (IT) positions and fewer than 50,000 computer science graduates to fill over 500,000 roles in 2020. In the same year, 79 percent of CEOs globally had concerns about tech talent shortages, and 61 percent of HR professionals around the world believed that tech talent shortages would be their biggest challenge in 2022.


The U.S. Black population is also growing. In 2019, 46.8 million people in the U.S. identified their race as Black, A quarter (25%) of those in the U.S. Black population are members of Generation Z – born between 1997 and 2012 and ages 7 to 22 in 2019. A further one-in-ten were under the age of 7 that year. Together, 35% of the U.S. Black population is age 22 or younger. Another 23% are Millennials, meaning that over half (59%) of the nation’s Black population were Millennials or younger (under age 38) in 2019.

The age structure of the Black population has also changed since 2000. As of 2019, the median age of single-race, non-Hispanic Black people is 35, compared with 30 in 2000. This makes the nation’s Black population younger than the nation’s single-race, non-Hispanic White population (with a median age of 43) and the single-race, non-Hispanic Asian population (38), and slightly older than the nation’s Hispanic population (29).

A quarter (25%) of those in the U.S. Black population are members of Generation Z – born between 1997 and 2012 and ages 7 to 22 in 2019. A further one-in-ten were under the age of 7 that year. Together, 35% of the U.S. Black population is age 22 or younger. Another 23% are Millennials, meaning that over half (59%) of the nation’s Black population were Millennials or younger (under age 38) in 2019.